Milk snakes

Striated Royal (milk) snakes (Lampropeltis triangulum)

Milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum) is a species of non-poisonous snakes, the habitat of which is distributed from North-Eastern Canada to Northern South America. Different subspecies of milk snakes inhabit swamps, deserts, forests and mountains. They live anywhere they can survive reptiles.

“Milk” snakes – why did you choose the name? Obviously, they don’t milk and don’t drink milk. Perhaps in the old days the milkman with a sense of humor some times I noticed this snake in the barn. And then, when the cow suddenly began to give less milk, have suggested that the snake drank it at night, while the snake cleared his farm from mice.

Scientific classification

Milk snake is part of the larger colubrid family (Colubridae), belong to the genus of king snakes (Lampropeltis) and type Triangulum, because they have characteristic differences from other king snakes. In his monograph, Williams (1998) identifies 25 subspecies of milk snakes Lampropeltis triangulum.

In the modern herpetoculture it is customary to use the Latin scientific name of the snakes and common, although scientific names are increasingly replacing common, especially when it comes to subspecies. For example, fans to refer to the subtype of breast snakes will use the name “hondurensis” or “campbelli”, or the transliteration of these names.

Systematics is a field that is constantly changing as new information regarding relationships between different species and subspecies of animals. There are, roughly speaking, two schools of thought in the field of systematics. “The revisionists” is a systematics who seek to allocate a new view based on the slightest differences.

The other extreme – taxonomists who believe that the classification should be less groups, and seek to combine the already allocated species and subspecies. For example, some of them believe all 25 subspecies of milk snakes the color or geographic variations of the species, and that they should be called Lampropeltis triangulum without isolation of the subspecies.

Terrariums as a rule, pay much attention to geographical variability of this species and are interested in the standardization of the language and the description of these geographically isolated variations.

The origin of the animals contained in the cage

Many subspecies of milk snakes are still caught in the wild. For example, striated airy milk snake (L. t. amaura) easily caught in the winter when the swamp freezes over. Find snakes by chopping rotten logs, located above the ice level. Many subspecies are captured without disturbing the environment. In this embodiment, the catcher just slowly goes the night on the way to the right location, and looking for milk snakes on the road or near it, on the banks of ponds or ditches, etc. This tactic is most effective in the early hours of summer nights.

Ringed striated Royal (L. t. triangulum) and striated aspidomorpha king snake (L. t. elapsoides) – two subspecies of milk snakes in the U.S. that massively caught in the wild for sale. Fortunately, many of the larger subspecies of milk snakes at the present time, thousands will breed in captivity.

Buy divorced in captivity the animal the more preferred before caught in the wild. It is, as a rule, free of parasites and communicable diseases, it does not need time to acclimatize and get used to the person.

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Milk snakes
Striated Royal (milk) snakes (Lampropeltis triangulum) Milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum) is a species of non-poisonous snakes, the habitat of which is distributed from North-Eastern Canada to Northern South America. Different…

Continue reading →